BACK Attached ESB 45 Back Proofs w/Color bars: Black Bespin Guard and Chewbacca

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(CLICK HERE, OR, ON PICTURE FOR INSANE-O CLOSE UP SHOT OF FRONT)

This is a rather odd and particularly rare piece. In recent years uncut proof sheets that were miraculously saved from destruction at the Kenner factory have lamentably been cut up for profit on the free market. Of course, focus collectors like myself benefit greatly from this, so it is not all bad. (Thanks Don!)

When I was offered the Chewbacca from this sheet I wanted to preserve some of the history that was lost in its cutting. So, I asked to have any other proof that was connected to my favorite wookiee. Luckily, it was one of my favorite figures, the Black Bespin Guard. It is cool because it is the debut card for this character, and there are surprisingly few 45 back proofs for him out there.

The "x" written in ink on the Guard is mysterious as it was added at the factory. Why is it there? Perhaps it was not originally supposed to be on that sheet of 8? Maybe it was to be reduced in production levels due to assumed low sales and would not need more cardbacks? Perhaps it was not the right color? I do not know. If you have an idea, please let me know.

The Color bars are part of the CMYK printing process that had each color applied in differing ratios to result in the final product. More on that below.

(CLICK HERE, OR, ON PICTURE FOR INSANE-O CLOSE UP SHOT OF BACK)

Here is the back of the incidental double proof. Note that the color bars are slightly different than they are on the front. Each of the 4 colors used in the CMYK process has a gradation scale with numbers that indicate the saturation of the color, but they appear on different sides of the sheet. The C (Cyan, or, Blue) and K (for blacK) are on the front, while the M (Magenta, or Red) and Y (Yellow) is featured here on the back.

There are other proof cards out there (not of Chewbacca) that only feature a couple of the four colors. The color bars lack the missing hues and that is how you know exactly what is missing. Because this proof sheet uses all four colors, we see all four represented. This is fascinating if you are into that stuff. If you are not, what are you doing looking at this in the first place?

If you want to know more about the CMYK process, check out this surprisingly helpful Wikipedia article.